They dropped like flakes. Emily Dickinson's Poem They Dropped Like Flakes 2022-10-19

They dropped like flakes Rating: 7,2/10 970 reviews

The phrase "they dropped like flakes" is often used to describe a situation where a large number of things fall or come apart suddenly and easily. This can be used to describe physical objects, such as snowflakes or flakes of paint, or abstract concepts, such as support or loyalty.

One possible context in which this phrase might be used is in the aftermath of a natural disaster. For example, a person might say that the roof of a building "dropped like flakes" after it was battered by strong winds or a hail storm. In this case, the roof is no longer able to withstand the forces acting upon it and falls apart easily.

Another possible context is in the realm of interpersonal relationships. Someone might say that their friends "dropped like flakes" after they experienced a difficult situation or made a tough decision. This could imply that these friends were not as supportive or loyal as the person had believed, and that they abandoned the person when they needed them most.

In both of these examples, the phrase "they dropped like flakes" suggests a sense of fragility or instability. Whether it is a physical object or a social relationship, it is something that is easily broken or falls apart under pressure.

Overall, the phrase "they dropped like flakes" is a vivid and evocative way of describing a situation where something falls apart easily or unexpectedly. Whether it is a natural disaster or a personal crisis, it is a reminder that even the seemingly solid and reliable things in our lives can be fragile and prone to falling apart.

They dropped like Flakes

they dropped like flakes

They Dropped Like Flakes, They Dropped Like Stars imagines the American landscape as a battlefield where returning soldiers take their own lives in unprecedented numbers. Are there other lists that are repealed? A couple of weeks later, Harper's Weekly published an unattributed Grandly the army wrought, on the murderous field of battle; It has wiped the stain of defeat from every soldier's brow: Mid the clash of steel on steel, and shouts, and the harsh death-rattle, The Army of the Potomac has won a victory now! His work from the battlefields of Afghanistan engaged most directly with the battlefield but in recent years his focus has been on the American landscape, from sites of military recruiting offices to U. Watching over humanity for all of their lives, the Lord hosts his final assessment when each individual person approaches the gates of heaven. Curated by John Carson Paul Seawright uses photography to explore the edges of civilized societal norms. But I don't think platitude is right.

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the prowling Bee: They dropped like Flakes —

they dropped like flakes

Back to Poems Index For Week Jan 1 — 7 Next Poem. She has used snow imagery before to symbolize purity; using it here suggests here that the soldiers are innocents falling together in a blizzard of death. Jesus was born in a stable in the city of Bethlehem. But ED also has poems like this one that take a more conventional view. They dropped like flakes, they dropped like stars, Like petals from a rose, When suddenly across the lune A wind with fingers goes. He was loved by many including His faithful Apostles, numerous disciples, and many other followers.

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They dropped like flakes Analysis Emily Dickinson : Summary Explanation Meaning Overview Essay Writing Critique Peer Review Literary Criticism Synopsis Online Education

they dropped like flakes

Yes, but how does that relate to the fallen soldiers? War seems to be a fact of nature just as snow, meteoroids, and roses are. Analysis of the poem. Critics such as Helen Vendler value ED's poems that are iconoclastic and heretical "The Bible is an antique volume" -- which also share the reference point but move away from conventional understanding. Something is falling softly and quietly, something like snowflakes, rose petals or shooting stars — seemingly something lovely and ephemeral. Up until the time of His death, Jesus was teaching and sharing the Good News, healing the sick, feeding the hungry, and helping the poor. Dickinson's vision offers the scope of time and one can wonder if she envisioned the thousands of acres of meadow and woods that now comprise the Gettysburg National Military Park. The three l's are a mouthful compared to "seamless".

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Emily Dickinson's Poem They Dropped Like Flakes

they dropped like flakes

The only force we see is that of a June "wind with fingers" that ruffles the roses. But immediately into the second stanza the word "perished" banishes any such preconceptions. Honor to ye brave men, whom the angel of death passed by! Anonymous I think "Repealless -- List" is the same list ED refers to when she says "Though my name rang loudest in the heavenly fame". Using this interpretation, we can see that the speaker of the poem views deceased Civil War soldiers as saviors whose noble sacrifices are comparable to that of the Messiah. They dropped like Flakes — They dropped like stars — Like Petals from a Rose — When suddenly across the June A Wind with fingers — goes — They perished in the seamless Grass — No eye could find the place — But God can summon every face On his Repealless — List. Quick fast explanatory summary. Like falling stars their sacrifice shines brightly as they die, their shed blood red as the scattered petals of a rose.

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They Dropped Like Flakes, They Dropped Like Stars

they dropped like flakes

Torn to pieces as they are, having lost 30,000 or 40,000 men in this last five days, they are not used up. His photographs use atmospherics to conjure up a strong sense of unease about what is absent, maybe more so than what is present. The last two lines don't seem organically tied to the rest of the poem. They dropped like flakes Analysis Emily Dickinson Characters archetypes. He looks to see that those faults come from a heart with pure intentions and that His people learn from their errors in an attempt to better themselves. The poem just hints at its subject.

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They Dropped Like Flakes — Paul Seawright

they dropped like flakes

Or perhaps this is Dickinson's oblique way of saying that each fallen soldier can be summoned by God — regardless of flag. No requests for explanation or general short comments allowed. The Battle of Gettysburg, a terrible three-day battle with 51,000 casualties, occurred in the same year as she wrote this poem. Upon further analysis, however, we can read into her poem an allusion to the death of Jesus Christ. Jesus Christ, a descendant of Abraham, the Son of Joseph, a carpenter of Nazareth, and Mary, His loving Mother.

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they dropped like flakes

The word should not roll off the tongue. The first fact is that Jesus died by crucifixion. This is one of the most famous Dickinson poems about the Civil War. Betrayed by the apostle Judas, Jesus was crucified by the Romans, by order of the Ruler Pontius Pilate. I imagine newspaper lists are amended as better information is obtained, but their lists are of a completely different order and category than God's.

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they dropped like flakes

He is Dean of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences and the University of Ulster in Belfast. I think if I read the poem out loud, that last line would throw me every time! For me, it wasn't so much the platitudes as the word "Repealless". It would have been better if I had likened the 'platitudinous' sentiment simply to other poems which, as you point out, express a more conventional religious view. Once the poem has been absorbed, however, this quietness has its own chill. It is like watching a movie battle with the sound turned off, the soldiers shot, bludgeoned, or bayonetted in silence, falling to the ground in silent slow motion.

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