The bluest eye thesis. The Bluest Eye Analysis English Literature Essay 2022-10-30

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The Bluest Eye, written by Toni Morrison in 1970, is a novel that explores themes of race, beauty, and self-esteem through the story of a young black girl named Pecola Breedlove. The novel's central thesis is that society's narrow and oppressive standards of beauty and worth are damaging and destructive, particularly for black women and girls.

Throughout the novel, Morrison depicts the ways in which Pecola and other black characters are subjected to degrading and dehumanizing treatment because of their race and their perceived lack of beauty. Pecola is especially vulnerable to these forces because she is a young girl growing up in a society that values white skin and European features as the epitome of beauty. Pecola longs for blue eyes, believing that if she had them, she would be considered beautiful and worthy of love and respect.

Despite the cruelty and hatred that she faces from others, Pecola remains a complex and sympathetic character. Morrison shows how Pecola's experiences of racism and marginalization have shaped her sense of self and her beliefs about her own worth. Pecola is a victim of both internalized racism and external oppression, and her struggle to find her place in the world is a poignant and heartbreaking one.

The Bluest Eye is ultimately a novel about the damaging effects of society's narrow standards of beauty and worth. Morrison suggests that these standards are not only harmful to individuals but also to society as a whole. By valuing certain types of beauty over others and perpetuating harmful stereotypes, society reinforces a system of oppression that divides and alienates people based on their appearance.

In conclusion, The Bluest Eye is a powerful and poignant novel that challenges readers to consider the ways in which society's standards of beauty and worth can be harmful and destructive. Through the story of Pecola Breedlove, Morrison highlights the ways in which racism and marginalization can shape an individual's sense of self and the devastating consequences that can result.

Analysis of Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye

the bluest eye thesis

She can only receive this wish, in effect, by blinding herself. Society has ways of alienating people for multiple reasons such as their race, gender, class, or beliefs. With Dick and Jane those answers are easy, simple, and exclusive. He was raised by his Great Aunt Jimmy, who died when Cholly was still a boy. The first chapter, feeling home: the kitchen as a self- empowering space in The Bluest Eye, explores the kitchen as a mimic of homeland for black Americans.

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The bluest eye thesis

the bluest eye thesis

They both got married and moved north to Loraine, Ohio. Claudia speaks of a childhood illness that she believes is a source of irritation to her mother. Pecola may be a misspelling of Peola, the character from the film named Peola, played by actress Freddi Washington. When Maureen Peal insults Pecola, Claudia immediately responds. Why might Morrison have chosen to present the events in a non-chronological way? Claudia and Frieda adore Mr. Rather at the end, she eventually lost sanity at a point where she thought she realized her dream and wished for blue eyes Collins 102. Furthermore, the media and society define physical beauty and in turn effect the self-esteem of characters in the novel.

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Beauty in The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison

the bluest eye thesis

The couple has children that Marie refuses to speak about. The milk nurtures Pecola in a false manner because it allows her to believe in false ideals. Work Cited Morrison, Toni. Morrison speaks from a place of understanding black culture because she is unapologetic in how she writes. Blue pays attention to Cholly and is a storyteller who captivates young Cholly with tales of what it felt like to be emancipated. To what extent is Cholly to blame for his violence against his family? Then, Angelou challenges those stereotypes by celebrating her own black features.

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(PDF) Bachelor Thesis bluest eye

the bluest eye thesis

She believes that if she, like Shirley Temple and Jane, has blue eyes, a central marker for beauty in the dominant culture, then she will be loved and her life will be bearable. When he arrives at the MacTeer home, Mr. By wishing for blue eyes rather than lighter skin, Pecola indicates that she wishes to see things differently as much as she wishes to be seen differently. The construction of discourse may include the examples femininity and racism. Cholly and Blue eat the melon together.

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The Bluest Eye Gender

the bluest eye thesis

For instance, Toni Morrison is the first African American laureate of the Nobel Prize for literature. The setting of the novel as stated earlier is Lorain, Ohio during the 1940s when discrimination for being black was rampant. Darlene is the first in a long series of women that Cholly will use as the focus of his frustration and anger at the oppression he experiences. Living in a completely racialised society, the lives of the people are determined and influenced, in one way or other, by the whiteness. These communities isolate the rest of society who does not match up to these ideals and least resembles them, such as Pecola. They try to obliterate their heritage, and eventually like Pecola Breedlove, the child protagonist, who yearns for blue eyes, has no recourse except madness.

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The Concept of Race in Toni Morrison's "The Bluest Eye"

the bluest eye thesis

Who will play with Jane? Adult women, having learned to hate the blackness of their own bodies, take this hatred out on their children—Mrs. Junior is bitter towards his own mother, even though he directs his hostility towards her cat. She responds to the rape by asking Soaphead Church for blue eyes. They are poor, powerless and marginalized. Pauline is perhaps most revelatory in a series of flashback memories. Junior again throws the cat at nearly the same moment his mother arrives. Breedlove to feelings of shame that she later passes on to Pecola.

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The bluest eye thesis

the bluest eye thesis

In order to make ends meet, the MacTeers take a boarder into their home, Mr. That parental love, gave them emotional security and confidence always to defend themselves, whenever the need arose. The Maginot Line smiles authentically at Claudia, Pecola, and Frieda—a smile that is more sincere than that of other adults who interact with the children, but her smile fades when she learns that Claudia and Frieda are not allowed to come into her apartment. These books present a sanitized version of family life and normalcy. Because of this deformity, Pauline could not easily grasp the standards of beauty, especially when she moves to Ohio. Although he says that the women are there for Bible study, Claudia and Frieda know, from the sound of his voice, that he is lying to them. She uses violence as a vent for her frustrations.

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The Bluest Eye Analysis English Literature Essay

the bluest eye thesis

In fact, Cholly loves Blue. Immediately following the incident with Maureen Peal, Claudia and Frieda have another discovery that impacts their understanding of the world and their corresponding loss of innocence. The foursome go on a walk and discover an unripe muscadine grape grove. Claudia lives in a green house, which connects her to the Dick and Jane story at the beginning of the novel. Father Father is a character in the Dick and Jane book series. When Cholly arrives in her life, Pauline is susceptible to believing that he is what she has been longing for and missing. They were disgusted, amused, shocked, outraged, or even excited by the story.

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