Figures of speech in the rime of the ancient mariner. The Rime of the Ancient Mariner Part III Summary & Analysis 2022-11-03

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Figures of speech, also known as rhetorical devices, are used in literature to add depth and color to the writing. They can be used to create vivid imagery, convey strong emotions, or add emphasis to certain ideas. The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, a poem by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, is full of figures of speech that help to bring the story and characters to life.

One figure of speech that Coleridge uses extensively in the poem is personification. Personification is the attribution of human characteristics to non-human things or abstract concepts. For example, in the poem the wind is personified as a "slimy thing" that "crawled with fingers" and the albatross is personified as a "white-cheek'd mate." Personification helps to bring these non-human elements of the story to life and helps the reader to better understand and relate to them.

Another figure of speech that appears frequently in the poem is metaphor. A metaphor is a comparison between two seemingly unrelated things using the words "like" or "as." In the poem, the Mariner is described as "death-in-life," and the ship is referred to as a "ghost." These metaphors help to convey the Mariner's feelings of despair and the eerie, otherworldly atmosphere of the story.

Coleridge also uses simile, a figure of speech that compares two things using the words "like" or "as," in the poem. For example, the Mariner describes the heat as "like a weight of lead." These comparisons help to paint a more vivid picture in the reader's mind and add depth to the description of the events in the story.

Finally, Coleridge uses imagery in the poem to create vivid and sensory descriptions of the events and characters. For example, the Mariner describes the sea as "like a sleeping woman," and the water snakes as "beautiful" and "golden." These descriptions help the reader to better visualize and understand the events of the story.

Overall, the figures of speech in The Rime of the Ancient Mariner play a crucial role in bringing the story and characters to life for the reader. They add depth and emotion to the writing, helping the reader to better understand and relate to the experiences of the Mariner.

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner Analysis

figures of speech in the rime of the ancient mariner

The personal appearance of the Mariner is gradually developed. Here are just a few reasons why we use figurative language: To create imagery. In 1817 Coleridge replaced the Argument by an epigraph taken from Thomas Burnet's Archaeologiae Philosophicae. And to and fro, and in and out, The wan stars danced between. It also went on getting louder and louder, and more dreadful every movement. I bit my arm, I sucked the blood, And cried, A sail! Almost upon the western wave Rested the broad bright Sun; When that strange shape drove suddenly Betwixt us and the Sun. What loud uproar bursts from that door! He has applied this to describe appearance of the characters, setting, give meaning to his work as well as involving readers in his work.

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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner by Samuel Taylor Coleridge Plot Summary

figures of speech in the rime of the ancient mariner

Coleridge utilizes personification to make the audience have a visualization of the nature of the scene and the character in the play, the device is also used to breathe air into the poem. Each throat Was parched, and glazed each eye. The sun is at 90 at Noon at the Equator. Wordsworth and I were neighbours, our conversations turned frequently on the two cardinal points of poetry, the power of exciting the sympathy of the reader by a faithful adherence to the truth of nature, and the power of giving the interest of novelty by the modifying colours of imagination. In this stanza, the Ancient Mariner looked terrified.

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The Rime of The Ancient Mariner: Part 1

figures of speech in the rime of the ancient mariner

Wordsworth, on the other hand, was to propose to himself as his object, to give the charm of novelty to things of every day, and to excite a feeling analogous to the supernatural, by awakening the mind's attention from the lethargy of custom, and directing it to the loveliness and the wonders of the world before us; an inexhaustible treasure, but for which, in consequence of the film of familiarity and selfish solicitude we have eyes, yet see not, and hearts that neither feel or understand. It also forced him to begin his tale of sin. In this stanza, the Mariner says that the sun seemed to attain greater height with the passage of each day, meaning that the ship was nearing the equator. Furthermore, Coleridge has well illustrated and utilized sense of hearing in several instances in the play. Now, just as countless creatures of the slimy sea lived on, even so he the ancient mariner continued living on board. The very deep did rot: Oh Christ! As they were drinking all. Yet all of them lay dead.

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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner: Part 4

figures of speech in the rime of the ancient mariner

His soul suffered great agony. It came closer and closer all the time. And they were all handsome. The harbour-bay was clear as glass, So smoothly it was strewn! Yet no saint ever took pity on him. Since they are sailors, they are very superstitious people and as soon as something bad happens, they blame it on that reason. Such changes were often editorial rather than merely correcting errors.

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The Rime Of The Ancient Mariner Diction Analysis

figures of speech in the rime of the ancient mariner

During this period, the moon shone dimly through the smoke like a white fog. And is that Woman all her crew? He has mostly employed use of sight and hearing than touch, taste and smell to effectively enlighten the audience. I moved my lips—the Pilot shrieked And fell down in a fit; The holy Hermit raised his eyes, And prayed where he did sit. . The ship crossed the harbor very quickly and entered the main sea waters. The mariner, an old man aged with wisdom, sets sail and does not travel far before he makes a decision he later regrets.

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The Rime Of The Ancient Mariner: Analisi E Figure Retoriche

figures of speech in the rime of the ancient mariner

In these lines the mariner says immediately I mariner urged them to notice that the ship did not sail in a zigzag course anymore and that it was coming towards us, straight, to be of great help to us. As if through a dungeon-grate he peered With broad and burning face. This curse ties directly with the mariner killing the albatross, this is proven when the sailors die, each soul passes the mariner like the whizz of his crossbow. The boat soon came closer to the ship. And some in Of the Spirit that plagued us so; Nine fathom deep he had followed us From the land of mist and snow. The whole quote is exemplary of the poet's message because it shows the original thoughts of the crew, all of who do not care about the preservation of this part of nature. Upon the whirl, where sank the ship, The boat spun round and round; And all was still, save that the hill Was telling of the sound.

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Figurative Language

figures of speech in the rime of the ancient mariner

It is then that the wind ceases, and the ship becomes trapped on a vast, calm sea. In the second edition of Lyrical Ballads, published in 1800, he replaced many of the archaic words. Coleridge uses symbolism and diction to instill the lesson of respect for nature and all of God's creation. He used to sing him hymns, in his sweet voice very loudly. An Albatross breaks the pristine lifelessness of the Antarctic.

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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (text of 1834)

figures of speech in the rime of the ancient mariner

From the fiends, that plague thee thus! Are those her sails that glance in the Sun, Like restless gossameres? The mariner says that instantly his body was twisted with a sorrowful, great, pain of mind and body. In a cyclic transfer of influence, the moon replaces the sun. He prayeth best, who loveth best All things both great and small; For the dear God who loveth us, He made and loveth all. Their souls whizz by the Mariner like shots from his cross-bow, but he alone is left alive to face whatever penance is demanded of him in his trials. Three young men are walking together to a wedding, when one of them is detained by a grizzled old sailor. And to him, he relates his story of sin.


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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner: Part 7

figures of speech in the rime of the ancient mariner

The bird had never had such food earlier, and it was hovering over the ship because there was food there. The bride hath paced into the hall, Red as a rose is she; Nodding their heads before her goes The merry minstrelsy. The sailors sailed away happily unaware of the disaster that awaited their ship. Coleridge has employed different imagery techniques to bring life to his work Dean 47. By using figurative terms, we allow the reader or listener to engage more actively with our words. On his voyage, he comes across an albatross bird and impulsively kills it with his crossbow. You can sometimes emphasize your point by stating the opposite of what you mean, or by making an obvious overstatement.

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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner Part III Summary & Analysis

figures of speech in the rime of the ancient mariner

Besides, the crew did not respond to their shouts of welcome. He loves to talk with marineres That come from a far countree. He went like one that hath been stunned, And is of sense forlorn: A sadder and a wiser man, He rose the morrow morn. There is a picturesque touch in this line. Once Louie becomes an Olympic athlete, the people of Torrance are proud of Louie for representing their town instead of being angry at him for causing trouble. They stood as signals to the land, Each one a lovely light; This seraph-band, each waved his hand, No voice did they impart— No voice; but oh! All types of figurative language are also literary devices, as they are tools that writers use to express meaning in creative and interesting ways.

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